Content 101: Product Titles

Product Titles (aka Item Name or Product Name) are like term papers: thoughtfully organized, focused on the topic at hand, concise, and informative.

Product titles should include essential product attributes. What do we mean by essential? Pretend that all of the product images on Amazon disappeared overnight. If customers only had the name of your product available, would they be able to make an informed buying decision? There are specific details you absolutely need to know before you place your order, right?

Let's look at an example: a sweater. Which brand is it? Is it for Women or Girls?  Is it a Small, Medium or Large? Is it Red or Blue? Does it have a particular style? Is it made from a specific material or fabric? "Sweater" definitely doesn't give us enough information. Even "ACME Sweater" doesn't come close! "ACME Women's Cashmere Turtleneck Sweater (Red, Small)" on the other hand, provides a succinct description of the product's key attributes.

It's important to remember that the Product Title is a catalog attribute and not a marketing vehicle: unless they're part of the product name, search terms and keywords should not be included. Going back to that sweater, details like "hand-woven on Mars," "dry clean only," and "perfect for layering" are relevant to customers--but they should be iterated in the bullet points or product description, not the Product Title.

Here are some basic guidelines for how to structure this content and which details should be included:

  • Keep it short: 80 characters or less is our rule of thumb
  • Begin with the brand name
  • The actual name of the product, the way it would be described in a sentence--no superlatives or slogans
  • Include variation or critical attribute information:
    • Model Number/Compatibility
    • Color
    • Size
    • Flavor
    • Material or fabric (i.e. Stainless Steel, Cashmere)
  • Include distinguishing or value-added features--would knowing this impact whether or not a customer decides to buy your product?
    • Waterproof
    • Organic
    • Solar-Powered
    • Remote-Controlled
  • Quantity (if applicable)
    • 3-Pack
    • 24-Count
  • Physical Dimensions (if your product or similar products come in multiple sizes, this is essential)
    • 16oz
    • A4 paper / 8.5x11 in

Content 101: Content Optimization

When it comes to e-commerce, the product details must be as compelling, informative, and thoughtfully crafted as the product's packaging. Your Amazon detail page should be designed and optimized for two unique audiences: future customers and Amazon's A9 Search Algorithm

Optimizing for Customers

Your product page is the e-commerce equivalent of your "shelf presence" and physical packaging. Because consumers don't have the ability to experience or inspect the product in person, you need to communicate all physical details through richly-written descriptive content and high-quality images. A+ and EBC also allow you to provide additional content and media to give customers a better understanding of your brand's origin story, why your product matters, and how your company or product differs from the competition.

Assume that the customer is utterly ignorant of both the product and the category or family of products it belongs to. To deliver the best possible customer experience, and ensure there is no confusion or misunderstanding once the product arrives at their door, it's essential to state exactly what the product is, its purpose and functionality, and precisely what customers can expect to find when they open the box. Does it include any accessories like a carrying case? Is there an essential accessory that is not included, like a charging cable or batteries? Are there any other products featured in the images or video that aren't included with their purchase?

Optimizing for A9: Amazon SEO

At a high level, A9 is the Amazon Search Algorithm that powers customer search within the Amazon ecosystem. Just like making sure your products are correctly categorized, it's imperative to optimize detail page content for A9 indexing. The first thing to keep in mind is that A9 doesn't index all of the detail page content; it only looks at the first 500 characters of the Product Title and Bullet Points and all priority keywords should be included in these attribute fields. How do you include all of these additional keywords without it looking like alphabet soup? Diversify your language. Instead of reusing the same words or phrases, use synonymous terms to maximize the indexable real estate.